Why is microblading a bad idea?

Microblading can damage the hair root follicle that is irreversible, causing the hairs to become ingrown or not grow at all. Scarring can occur if proper equipment is not used and, if this happens, you will not be able to receive other treatment in the eyebrow area.

Why is microblading a bad idea?

Microblading can damage the hair root follicle that is irreversible, causing the hairs to become ingrown or not grow at all. Scarring can occur if proper equipment is not used and, if this happens, you will not be able to receive other treatment in the eyebrow area. Microblading is promoted by beauticians as the semi-permanent makeup solution for perfect eyebrows, but it is a technique that can leave you disastrous results. The main (and most frightening) problem with microblading is that the procedure cuts the skin to deposit the pigment.

Every time the skin is cut, there is a serious risk of infection and scar tissue. If your technician uses dirty water or equipment, it can spread bacteria such as staph (staph). They can also spread viruses such as HIV, hepatitis, or herpes. Sometimes the ink is contaminated with bacteria or mold.

There is no guarantee that it will be safe, even if the package is sealed. Your doctor may give you antibiotics, antivirals, or antifungals if you get an infection. This could be a sign of infection or allergy. Even if you wait long enough for all the ugly, stained colors to fade, you'll have compromised skin, possibly forever.

If the colors or strokes are bad, then maybe you can remove the microblading, but you can't remove the scars. Unfortunately, most microblading technicians today have only completed a 2-4 day training and have no artistic skills. This leads to poor techniques being too deep, ugly designs and unaware of the repercussions. This myth stems from a misunderstanding of the microblading process.

As mentioned earlier, the pigment in microblading is placed closer to the surface of the skin than a tattoo. This means that it will fade over time and disappear naturally. Xeviare Elezi, office manager at a construction company that sought out Vucetaj after his sharp eyebrows turned “bluish gray”, says the risks of microblading aren't worth it. Microblading is now so common that finding a qualified and certified professional to perform the treatment in any given location is not even very difficult.

Promising arches that look thicker, brighter and perpetually sloppy, eyebrow lamination is a needle-free alternative to microblading that produces less permanent results. Without these tweaks, Menendez says you would see how the microbladed eyebrows fade and eventually disappear completely after three years. Luckily, when I did microblading in the past, I had a lot of hand control due to my training in fine arts and worked very superficially on the skin. This type of skin that can receive microblading is not too oily, not too dry, not too thick, not too thin, not sensitive and very youthful.

During the first week, the healing process can transform the results into a darker color before removing the scab after the microblading procedure. Microblading is the process of applying tiny, semi-permanent tattoos to the eyebrow area to mimic the look of hair. If you're happy with your microblading results, then you'll probably want to make sure your eyebrows look as full as possible for as long as possible. It first emerged about five years ago, marketed as microblading even though no real blade is used.

Therefore, a growing number of women, including Lena Dunham, Minka Kelly, Mandy Moore and Bella Thorne, as well as hundreds of beauty buffs on Instagram, are turning to a permanent makeup solution, crediting microblading for their miraculous eyebrows.

Danielle Easterwood
Danielle Easterwood

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